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How to Clean Your Paintballs

Posted by Will M. on 2/21/2014



Did THIS guy just deliver your paintballs?



Better check your case for breaks!

A common problem that paintballers face is what to do if you have a broken paintball in a bag of paint. Using paint from a bag with breaks without first cleaning it can cause your hopper to jam, your paintball gun's eyes to become dirty and malfunction, or can lead to breaks in your breech and barrel. Cleaning your dirty paintballs only takes a few minutes, and can save your gun from facing issues on the field.

It is pretty hard to miss when there is a broken paintball in a bag of paint. Players often mistake the presence of lubricant in a bag of paint as a broken ball. Lubricant is added at the factory during the process of manufacture. Sometimes the factory gets carried away, but you should only need to clean the lube off if there is an excess amount in the bag, like in the pic below (right).







Broken paintballs are noticeable as they leave a thick, cloudy residue in the bag. You will also find broken or cracked paintball shells in the bag, and should remove these before cleaning.

Lube is often thinner and transparent. Some amount of lube in a bag of paintballs is normal and can easily be wiped away.



To clean your paintballs, carefully pour your dirty or oily paintballs onto a paper towel. This method is intended to clean paintballs that have been in contact with a broken paintball or that are oily. If your paintballs have fallen onto the floor at a paintball field or outdoors it is recommended to dispose of them rather then clean them. Grit or other debris may be attached to a paintball and can potentially scratch your breech or barrel when shot.
 
Fold the paper towel over top of your paintballs and gently roll it back and forth until your paintballs are clean. It's just that easy!
 




Do not use a moist towel or paper towels to clean your paintballs. Contact with water will damage your paintball shells, and will increase the chances of paint breaking in your hopper or gun. Armed with this knowledge, you can now double check your paint before you head to the field to ensure you are getting top performance out of your paintballs!

Comments

Date 2/22/2014
Mike
Seriously ? Thanks for pointing this out, captain obvious !
Date 2/24/2014
Captain Obvious
Seriously. Not everyone is an experienced player and knows this. This is something that comes up all the time, and if people are asking what to do with their broken paint, then it really is not so obvious after all.

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